Proposed Business License Tax Increase

  Mayor Wheeler’s proposed budget includes an increase in the Business License Tax (going from 2.2 percent of a businesses’ net income to 2.6 percent). It also includes, as an offset, a 21% increase in the Owners Compensation Deduction (going from $103,500 to $125,000). Impact to Your Business The proposed tax increase is .004 (or an additional $4 per $1,000 in taxes paid). The City created a calculator to determine how the proposed changes will impact your business. A few example scenarios: $100,000 Net Income: Sole Proprietor would pay $650 $200,000 Net Income: Sole Proprietor would pay $1,950 $500,000 Net Income: Sole Proprietor would pay $9,750 Owners Compensation Deduction The Owners Compensation Deduction currently allows business owners to deduct 75% of their net income, not to exceed $103,500 per owner, when filing their taxes. When the Owners Compensation Deduction had its last meaningful increase in 2014 (going from $92,000 to $100,000), the city estimated that more than 4,000 businesses would save $865,000 the year it went into effect. Please note, businesses grossing under $50,000 per year before expenses are exempt from paying the Business License Tax. For nonexempt businesses, the Owners Compensation Deduction allows them to deduct a portion of their net income pre-tax. Proposed Use of Tax Increase The Mayor expects the increased tax to generate $15 million/year. Per the Mayor’s proposed budget: “These changes [Business License Tax increase] would result in an estimated $15.3 million in additional revenues this year [7/1/18-6/30/19] to stabilize the budget for homeless services, invest more in moving people out of shelters and into housing, fund programs in the Police Bureau that support community-centered...

Design Overlay Zones Amendments Projects Feedback

  The City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is seeking feedback on the Design Overlay Zones Amendments (DOZA) project. The DOZA Process projects would allow smaller projects in Gateway to use Community Design Standards as alternative to a design review The quality of building design matters for a growing city. And the rules and processes to ensure good, human-centered design for our most populated, growing and vibrant places is important for the entire community. So, these rules need to be evaluated and updated periodically. The Design Overlay Zones Amendments projects — DOZA Process and DOZA Tools — do just that; they hit the reset button on the rules for Portland’s Design overlay zone (the d-overlay) and design review program. The DOZA Process Discussion Draft is now ready for review; a DOZA Tools Concept Report will be released in early May 2018. Learn more and read the DOZA Process Discussion Draft here. Comments due June 1,...
Development Update: 9745 NE Glisan Street

Development Update: 9745 NE Glisan Street

Northwest Housing Alternatives is proposing a new development at 9745 NE Glisan Street. The development is 4 stories and has 160 units serving small households at or below 60% of area median income. Rents are estimated to be set at $700-$900.  Construction is estimated to begin in October of 2018. View floor plans and building renditions here. Questions or comments? Reach out to Monika Elgert of Northwest Housing Alternatives at elgert@nwhousing.org or 503.654.1007...
Meet your Neighbor: Mark Fulop of Portland Adventist Community Services

Meet your Neighbor: Mark Fulop of Portland Adventist Community Services

Mark Fulop became the Executive Director for Portland Adventist Community Services (PACS) in December 2017.  PACS has been serving low-income Portlanders and providing community services since 1934. What does your business do? PACS is built around providing three core services.  The Thrift Shop designed to support low-income families with clothing and everyday household goods.  The Food Pantry provides a 3-5 day food supply to over 6,000 households in need every month. The pantry is set up like a grocery store so people can select food from different categories to fit their needs and preferences. The Medical Clinic provides medical services to families in need. What might readers be surprised to know about your business?  The services provided by PACS are made possible by volunteers.  There are about 250 volunteers per month who provide about 44,000 volunteer hours per year… and we also have a mobile food pantry that takes our services to 8 community sites in the region every month. What should the community be excited about for 2018 and PACS? We will be opening a combined medical dental clinic later this year.  This expansion will bring much needed dental care to low income adults in our community. What do you love about Gateway? Having only been in Gateway as the Executive Director since December 2017, I love the diversity of this community as well as the many hidden gems in Gateway. What would a perfect day in Gateway look like? It would be a sunny day and I would have time to walk around the district, visit our business neighbors, meet more members of the community, and discover...
Meeting Recap: Mayor Ted Wheeler and Commissioner Chloe Eudaly

Meeting Recap: Mayor Ted Wheeler and Commissioner Chloe Eudaly

The Gateway Area Business Association started 2018 by hosting two luncheons with Commissioner Chloe Eudaly and Mayor Ted Wheeler. Commissioner Chloe Eudaly joined us on January 11th. She began her remarks by highlighting her past as a former business owner and addressed the need for affordable  housing and commercial space in Portland. She then took questions from the audience, which included addressing Airbnb’s impact on housing availability and livability issues. At this meeting, Hospitality Committee Chair Karen Montez awarded the Citizen of the Year award to Linda Robinson of Friends of Gateway Green.  “I’ve never seen such a dedication to community, to neighborhoods, to involvement, to improvement of everything we have here, be it business, residential, parks” said Karen Montez regarding Linda Robinson. Mayor Ted Wheeler attended our luncheon on February. The Mayor spoke to the coordinated approach outlined in the Gateway Action Plan to focus investments on three key areas in the district: the Halsey/Weidler corridor ($20 million), Gateway Transit Center ($8 million) and Central Gateway ($2 million). There is an opportunity fund of $5 million with no geographic boundary. The Mayor answered questions regarding crime & livability support in the district, traffic concerns and regulations on cannabis businesses. The full text of Mayor Wheeler’s opening remarks can be found...